Archive for Pitch Counts

PITCH COUNTS: Are They Really Working…or Resulting in Too Many HS Forfeits?

Now that we’re most than halfway through the HS baseball season, I thought it would be smart to review whether the state-by-state rules regarding pitch counts and limits are actually having a positive impact.

And overall, I do think it’s very fair to say that the pitch count rules have – if nothing else – have finally made baseball coaches — and hopefully parents — aware of the dangers of having young arms be overly taxed during their teenage years.

And that’s all to the good.

But in order to achieve this goal, there have been a lot of extra rules and regulations put into place, and seemingly done so in a rushed fashion. The end result has been a startling number of HS games forfeit due to pitch count violations, as well as more and more coaches trying to work a sense of gamemanship into their strategy. As a result, the bottom line is that the pitch count rules have to be viewed as very much a work still in progress.

As my guest Steve Kallas pointed out, there have games forfeit all over the country, including New Jersey, Illinois, North Carolina, Idaho – pretty much everywhere. For example, in Illinois, in one game, one team was up 13-3 and there was really no need for the starting pitcher who had the lead to go out and pitch another  inning. But his coach apparently lost track of how many days of rest the kid had, and the game ended up as a forfeit.

In fact, there have been at least 11 forfeits in Illinois this year alone. 

In Colorado, a HS which won a game 8-4 saw that win turn into a loss when they had to forfeit the game.

In North Carolina, the AD of the winning HS team reported his baseball coach’s mistake regarding a pitch count to the league board and that ended in a forfeit

Closer to home, in NJ, the Carteret  v. Perth Amboy game a couple of weeks ago ended with a pitch count dispute. The outcome of that game is still in dispute.

As the calls poured in, it was clear that HS coaches were now finding ways to use the pitch count as a weapon against the opposing team. For example, instructing one’s batters to take as many pitches as possible in order to push the pitcher’s count higher late in the game. Other coaches were throwing their ace only 30 pitches on one day, then allowing him to come back the very next day for another 30. Then, having him rest a day, and coming back to throw 50-60 pitches the next day. In many states, that’s very legal, even though it’s probably not very healthy for the kid’s arm.

Others complained about why it’s the home team that has the ultimate verdict on pitch counts. That is, if there’s a discrepancy between the home and visiting team, it’s the home team whose count wins. Umpires clearly do not want to get in the middle of these disputes.

And on and on the conversation went. It was clear to Steve and myself that this is an issue that needs to addressed and modified and reworked in the off-season. And the first issue to start with is – -why is the game totally forfeit? That seems like a draconian punishment for all concerned. There has to be a better – and fairer – way to protect kids’ arms via the new pitch count limits.

 

 

PITCH COUNTS: A Deeper Look into New York State’s Rules

NEW YORK PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL PITCH COUNT RULES TO GO INTO EFFECT THIS SEASON

                                                    By Steve Kallas

(The following article discusses the new pitch count rules for New York State only.  For a list of the rules in other states, please see J.J. Cooper’s article at baseballamerica.com entitled, “High School Pitch Count Rules By State.”)

In July 2016, the National Federation of State High School Associations (“NFHS”) announced that, beginning with the 2017 spring baseball season, each state member would have to institute a pitch count rule for high school baseball.  Now, virtually every state has their own rules and, while well-intentioned, there are already issues depending upon the state.  New York State, in particular, has made a terrible mistake by changing the common definition of days of rest.

NEW YORK STATE PITCHING RULES FOR THE 2017 SEASON

Following the directive of the NFHS, the New York State Public High School Athletic Association (“NYSPHSAA”) Executive Committee held meetings on October 19, 2016 and January 27, 2017.  At these meetings, the new pitch count rules were discussed, first as a “Discussion/Information Item” (at the October meeting) and then as an “Action Item” in January.  At the January meeting, the rules discussed below were approved for implementation for the 2017 spring season.

It should be noted here that the NYSPHSAA does not govern public schools in New York City.  Those public schools are governed by the Public Schools Athletic League (“PSAL”).  The PSAL has had pitch count rules in effect since 2011.  In addition, the Catholic High School Athletic Association (“CHSAA”) recently piggy-backed on the NYSPHSAA rules with one major improvement.

THE ACTUAL RULES

We will focus on the new high school varsity rules.

Here are the pitch counts set forth for varsity play this year included with what New York State is calling “nights of rest.”  Unfortunately, right away, the theory of nights of rest (as opposed to days of rest) is a dangerous one for young pitchers and New York seems to be the only state to use this odd distinction.

If a varsity pitcher throws 1-30 pitches, he needs one night of rest; 31-65 pitches, two nights of rest; 66-95 pitches, three nights of rest; and 96-105 pitches, four nights of rest.

Here’s the dangerous part.  Any major league baseball fan knows and understands that a pitcher today pitches on four days of rest; that is, if he pitches on Monday, he rests on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, and is ready to take his regular turn pitching on Saturday.  But in New York, for high school kids who throw between 96 and 105 pitches in a game, the rules talk about nights of rest and, believe it or not, when a high school kid (of any age) pitches on Monday afternoon, his first “night” of rest is MONDAY NIGHT (not Tuesday).

So, New York has taken off a day of rest by changing the age-old definition of a day of rest.  In New York, when your son pitches on Monday, he “rests” on Monday night, Tuesday night, Wednesday night and Thursday night, and is actually allowed to throw another 105 pitches on Friday.

That is really the equivalent of pitching on three days of rest, not four.  Understand that, in 2017, no major league pitcher does this unless their team is in a tight playoff race late in the season or in the playoffs.  And when, in the pros, they talk about a pitcher pitching on “short” rest, well, that’s what New York State pitchers will be routinely doing based on this redefining of days of rest to nights of rest.

WHERE DID THE SUGGESTED PITCH COUNTS AND DAYS OF REST COME FROM?

Dr. James Andrews is considered by virtually everybody to be the foremost authority in the world on pitching arms (young and professional) and suggested pitch counts and days of rest for high school pitchers.  Indeed, it is Dr. Andrews, his assistant Dr. Glenn Fleisig, Dr. Christopher Ahmad (head team physician of the New York Yankees) and others who combined to recommend pitching guidelines for PitchSmart (mlb.com/pitchsmart).  It is these recommendations that were given to the NFHS, among others, and, hopefully, would have been implemented by New York State and others.

BUT THAT’S JUST NOT THE CASE

The Pitch Smart recommendations are as follows (and days of rest is days of rest as everybody knows them; the following day is the first day of rest, not the night that you pitch). For 17-18 year olds (essentially, but not always, the age of high school varsity pitchers), the recommendations are: 1-30 pitches, no days of rest; 31-45 pitches, 1 day of rest, 46-60 pitches, two days of rest; 61-80 pitches, three days of rest; 81 or more pitches, four days of rest.

While virtually all states have not followed these recommendations (nor, apparently, is there any requirement that they must), New York has really created a potential problem for young pitchers by eliminating one day of rest by inventing the “night” of rest.

So, as of now, a varsity pitcher who throws 95 pitches on Tuesday can throw 95 pitches on Friday (that’s three nights but, really, only two days of rest) and then throw 95 more the following Monday.  Understand that no major league pitcher throws 285 pitches in seven days except in the rarest of circumstances.  These regulations are even worse than the four nights of rest.  But even with four nights of rest (which, again, is only three days of rest), a high school varsity pitcher can throw 105 pitches on Tuesday, 105 on Saturday and another 105 on Wednesday.  Again, no major league baseball pitcher will throw 315 pitches in nine days except in the rarest of circumstances.

By definition, the “nights” of rest definition is a bad rule.

The CHSAA, realizing the mistake that’s been made by the NYSPHSAA, has recently instituted similar rules but counts the days of rest as the rest of the country counts days of rest; that is, if you pitch the maximum on Monday, you can’t pitch again until Saturday (four days of rest).

BUT, WAIT, THERE’S MORE

For some reason, when playoff time comes around, the NYSPHAA has decided to increase the number of allowable pitches to a maximum of 125.  The “Varsity Post Season” rules are: 1-40 pitches, one night of rest (that means you can throw 40 pitches on Tuesday, rest Tuesday night and throw 40 pitches on Wednesday); 41-71 pitches, two nights of rest (that means you can throw 71 pitches on Tuesday and 71 more on Thursday and 71 more on Saturday); 72-102 pitches, three nights of rest (that means you can throw 102 on Tuesday, 102 more on Friday and 102 more on Monday for a grand total of 306 in seven days, which is pretty scary); and 103-125 pitches, four nights of rest, (that means you can throw 125 on Tuesday, 125 more on Saturday and 125 more on Wednesday for another scary total of 375 pitches in nine days).

Again, virtually no major league pitcher will throw that many pitches in a seven or nine-day span.

ARE PITCH COUNTS NECESSARY?

Actually, an interesting question.  Most high school coaches are right-minded people looking out for the best interests of their players, especially their pitchers.  These pitch count rules, even with a poor definition of days of rest, are better than the prior rule which, believe it or not, put a limit of 12 (yes, 12) innings in one appearance.  You only have to go to a few high school games to understand that a 12- inning appearance could easily go into the 140s or higher for a pitch count.

The problem becomes with that rare coach who wants to win at all costs, or the coach who thinks that, since he has a big, strong kid who’s willing to keep going out there, it won’t hurt him this one time, or the coach who loses his mind because, after all, it’s the playoffs.

On balance, it says here that pitch counts are necessary.  Indeed, what this really means, especially for small schools, is that a higher percentage of your team has to be able to pitch (at least a few innings) to get through the season, especially later in the season when the rainouts and cancellations have to be made up.

WHAT’S A PARENT TO DO?

While the overwhelming majority of coaches do a good job managing their pitchers to protect their arms, the theory here is that, given the explosion in Tommy John surgeries in the last 15 years or so, something had to be done.  Many of these coaches correctly point out that these rules won’t stop a kid from pitching for his high school during the week and then pitching on the weekend for a travel team or at a showcase, where he will throw as hard as he can (to impress college coaches or major league scouts).

While there is, at times, some overlap between the high school season and other baseball commitments, this is where the intelligent parent(s) has to step in and protect their son.  When your child is an excellent young pitcher, many people will try to take advantage of that.  While there are many excellent travel coaches, you probably should not let your child pitch on two teams at once; if you do, then it is up to you to regulate his pitch count.

Travel coaches are also in the business of winning.  The best approach, in this writer’s opinion, is to avoid pitching for multiple teams at the same time.  If your son does, keep his pitch count, not per team, but for your son as an individual.  If he has the talent to go to a showcase, talk with one or both coaches to set up a proper rest period both before and after the showcase.  Or, don’t go to a showcase at all (which would be tough under today’s system).

I would strongly suggest that you follow the guidelines for pitches AND days of rest at mlb.com/pitchsmart/pitching-guidelines.  These have recommendations for all ages.  If you can adhere to these recommendations (or, at least, get close to them), this will give your son a better chance (no guarantees) that he can avoid the epidemic of arm injuries that is spreading across the country now.

ONE ADDITIONAL ISSUE

Who’s going to count the pitches?  The new rule states that each team keeps the pitch count, checks with the other and, if there’s a discrepancy, the home team’s count rules.

Uh-oh!  That could be a problem if the count goes up a pitch or two (or three) per inning against the visiting team’s star pitcher.  Could that happen? Well, in the overwhelming majority of situations, it won’t.  But, mistakes are made and, on (rare) occasions, someone may try to get the upper hand.

Also, for violation of this rule, the punishment doesn’t fit the crime.  Apparently, games can (and will?) be forfeited if pitch count mistakes are made.  That raises a number of issues: what if it was an honest mistake? How do you prove it (absent a video of the game, which may now occur more)?  Isn’t that too big of a penalty?

The PSAL rule is that the coach is suspended for one game on the first violation.  After that, more serious punishment, including forfeiture of the game, is considered.  Indeed, the NYSPHSAA originally had a one-game suspension for the coach for the first offense and a two-game suspension and forfeiture for the second offense.

But the final rule states forfeiture for the first offense.  The PSAL rule seems more reasonable.

CONCLUSION

While well-meaning, the new rules for pitch counts, days of rest and penalties for mistakes can (and will) lead to issues.  While an improvement on the past innings-limit rules (12 innings in one appearance and no more than 18 innings in a six-day period), they have to be carefully monitored and looked at during the season.

Obviously, that definition of rest should be changed immediately and the pitch counters have to be looked at carefully (and improved).

And, remember, parents, it’s up to YOU, more than anyone (including right-minded coaches), to protect your son.

By the way…..the pitch count rules for JV/FR:  1-30 pitches, one night of rest; 31-45 pitches, two nights of rest; 46-75 pitches, three nights of rest; 76-85 pitches, four nights of rest*

Pitch count rules for Modified: 1-20 pitches, one night of rest; 21-40 pitches, two nights of rest; 41-60 pitches, three nights of rest; 61-75 pitches, four nights of rest*

*Remember, the first night of rest is the night that you pitched. See main article for further explanation

Editor’s Note: In addition to being a top attorney and sports parenting expert, Steve was a standout Division I baseball player at New York University.

© COPYRIGHT 2017 BY STEVE KALLAS ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

 

 

 

PITCH COUNTS: A Few More Thoughts on this Topic…

As has been outlined by the National Federation of High Schools, starting this spring every state in the country will have set up and put into place various pitch limits for all public high schools at the varsity, junior varsity, freshmen, and modified levels.

The idea, of course, is to ideally prevent teenagers from ruining their arms from overpitching and subsequent serious Tommy John injuries.

So far, this all sounds good. But the more I reflected on this move, and the more I discussed it with my colleague Steve Kallas, the more I did a 180. Specifically:

Is it even possible that there’s a HS baseball coach anywhere in this country who doesn’t know about the concerns of injuring a kid’s arm from having him throw too many pitches? I mean, pitch counts have been in the news for well over a decade now. And if you’re a varsity baseball coach, and aren’t aware of these concerns, I would suggest that you probably aren’t a good candidate to coach baseball.

Moving on, why are individual states being allowed to come up with their rules on pitch limits? That is, if you don’t know this yet, every state has its own regulations regarding pitch limits, how many days of rest are mandated, how many pitches can be added to the overall game total in playoff games, and what the punishments are for violating these rules.

Even worse, not only are these pitch count rules hard to follow, but they differ substantially from one neighboring state to the next.

And there’s no probationary time. That is, these rules are in force for this season, and in some southern states where the games are already being played, there are already concerns about implementation and monitoring pitch counts. Among other concerns, if a coach is found in violation of the pitch limits, the punishments range from having the game forfeit, to the coach being suspended and fined for his actions.

ARE THESE REALLY NEEDED?

I have three suggestions:

Why not make the 2017 season just a probationary, experimental season where these pitch count rules can be put in place, but only on a trial basis? Let’s see how they work in real game situations, and then after the season is over in June, the state boards can determine what worked, and what didn’t, and then make corrections.

In addition, why have the rules vary from state to state? Just come out with one universal standard set of rules for everyone. That’s just common sense. I’m not sure why the individual states need to have their own rules.

And finally, do we even need these pitch counts in the first place? If you have an experienced HS baseball coach, then he should already be more than familiar with making sure that his ace pitcher doesn’t ruin his arm by throwing too many innings, or is being used too many times. And if the coach doesn’t know these parameters, or is too hell-bent on winning a league championship, even if it means risking his top pitcher’s arm, well, it’s up to the kid’s parents to step and intervene. But again, I would find it very hard to believe that there’s a HS pitcher these days who isn’t aware of the risks of having a HS kid throw too much.

Bottom line? Pitch counts may be a good idea, and every coach needs to be aware of them. But enforcing them in a hard-and-fast way seems too much too soon.

PITCH COUNTS: Brand New Pitch Limits Start This Spring All Over the Country: Be Forewarned!

PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL PITCH COUNTS TO GO INTO EFFECT THIS SEASON

By Steve Kallas

In July 2016, the National Federation of State High School Associations (“NFHS”) announced that, beginning with the 2017 spring baseball season, each state member would have to institute a pitch count rule for high school baseball.  Now, virtually every state has made up its own rules and, while well-intentioned, there are already issues depending on the state.

THE HISTORY OF LITTLE LEAGUE PITCH COUNTS

For those who have listened for years to Rick Wolff’s “The Sports Edge” show over the years (Sunday mornings at 8 on WFAN radio and wfan.com), you will remember that a similar issue came up with Little League Baseball about ten years ago when they instituted a pitch count based, allegedly, on the work of Dr. James Andrews, the foremost authority in the world on young pitchers and protecting their arms.

Back then, as now for high schools, Dr. Andrews suggested pitch count ranges along with proscribed days of rest to help protect young arms.  Little League adopted the pitch counts but, without telling Dr. Andrews, lowered the days of rest for pitchers who threw 85 pitches from four days (the Andrews’ suggestion) to just three days (for the regular LL season) and then to an incredible just two days of rest (for the Williamsport tournament).

While literally thousands of articles were written at that time praising Little League for its “innovative” pitch limits, Rick Wolff and I wrote two articles strongly criticizing the days-of-rest change, which legally allowed 12-year-olds to throw more pitches (260) in a nine-day span than virtually every major league pitcher. One youngster, Kyle Cotcamp, actually threw 267 pitches over a nine-day period in the LL World Series in Williamsport in 2007. He underwent Tommy John surgery just a few years later. During that same LL World Series, three other kids threw at least 230 pitches in seven days.

After several years passed, it took interviews with Little League President Steve Keener and Dr. Andrews (who was finally told of the change in the change of days of rest) to eventually have Little League “correct” its mistake.

NOW FROM LITTLE LEAGUE TO HIGH SCHOOLS

The NFHS has instituted the pitch count rules to begin in the 2017 season, but has left it up to each individual state to set their own rules.  We will focus on New York, New Jersey and Connecticut to point out the rules and their unique differences.  It is disappointing to note that, while Dr. Andrews recommends that a 17-18 year old pitcher should have four full days of rest if he throws more that 81 pitches in a game, none of the above states will implementing that approach. 

NEW YORK STATE

The New York State pitch count rules are probably the most troubling.  That’s because, as with Little League many years ago, New York has changed the days of rest.  How are they doing that?  By saying that, when a pitcher pitches on a Tuesday afternoon, Tuesday night (as opposed to Wednesday) is his first “day of rest” (or, more appropriately, “night of rest”).

Thus, for example, under the New York new varsity pitch count rules, a pitcher who throws between 96 and 105 pitches needs four days of rest.  So a pitcher who throws 105 pitches on Monday, under the (until now) way everybody else in baseball considers days of rest, the youngster could not pitch again until Saturday (with Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday as his four days of rest).

However, under the New York definition, according to Ed Dopp, the New York State baseball chairman, Monday night (in the above example), and NOT Tuesday, is the first “night of rest.”  So therefore, the pitcher who throws 105 pitches on Monday can pitch again on Friday, not wait until Saturday (as all major league pitchers would).  (For an excellent article on the New York days of rest issue, see Vincent Mercogliano’s article at lohud.com on January 27,2017.)

Thus, New York pitchers can throw more pitches in a five-day span than any major leaguer will (barring the extreme rarity of an MLB pitcher pitching on three days of rest during crunch time, usually late in the season or in the playoffs).

By definition, that New York rule is a bad rule.

Here are the varsity numbers in New York: 1-30 pitches, 1 day of rest; 31-65 pitches, 2 days of rest; 66-95 pitches, 3 days of rest; 96-105 pitches, 4 days of rest.

But understand that, in New York, if a pitcher throws 30 pitches on Monday, he can then pitch on Tuesday (because of the new “night of rest“ rule – that is, Monday night is the one day of rest).  If a pitcher throws 65 pitches on Monday, he can pitch again on Wednesday (yes, that’s two days of rest).  If he throws 95 pitches on Monday, he can pitch again on Thursday (again, outrageous.  No major leaguer would pitch again until Saturday).

If the purpose is to try and protect kids’ arms, this is scary stuff.

Furthermore, in New York, once the HS playoffs start, the top limit is moved from 105 pitches to 125 pitches.  Why?  So coaches can ride their top pitcher 20 pitches more?  In a much more (generally-speaking) tense game?  With much more at stake?

This all seem certainly seems counter-intuitive.

One final New York note:  the NFHS does not govern New York City; the Public School Athletic League (“PSAL”) does (for public schools).  The PSAL has had pitch count rules in effect since 2011.  As far as I can tell, the PSAL counts days of rest the way the rest of the world does; for example, if a public school pitcher in New York City throws 91 to 105 pitches on Monday (105 being the limit), that pitcher needs four full days of rest and cannot pitch again until Saturday.

NEW JERSEY

Of the three states discussed here (for a complete list, see the article in baseballamerica.com by J.J. Cooper from February 10, 2017), New Jersey has done the best job but still falls short compared to the Dr. Andrews recommendations.

Here are the varsity numbers in New Jersey:  1-30 pitches, 0 days of rest; 31-50 pitches, 1 day of rest; 51-70 pitches, 2 days of rest; 71-90 pitches, 3 days of rest; 91-110 pitches, 4 days of rest.  Keep in mind that New Jersey counts days of rest the way everybody does; that is, if you throw 110 pitches on Monday, you can’t pitch again until Saturday.

But New Jersey has added some additional rules that can only be viewed as positive for young pitchers.  For example, a pitcher cannot pitch on three consecutive days, even if he only throws less than 30 pitches the first two days.  In addition, a pitcher who pitches on consecutive days cannot throw more than 50 pitches (so if he throws 30 pitches on Monday, he can only throw 20 the next day).

CONNECTICUT

The strangest part of the new Connecticut pitch count rule is the fact that there appears to be no upward limit.  That is, based on the rules as currently written, it seems a pitcher can throw 110, 130, 150 or even more in one day.  While common sense would dictate that this won’t happen, you never know if you have a coach in an extra-inning playoff game or a coach who wants to win at all costs or a coach (very rare) who really doesn’t look out for a pitcher’s best interests.

Here are the varsity numbers in Connecticut: 1-25, 0 days of rest; 26-50, 1 day of rest; 51-75, 2 days of rest; 76-110, 3 days of rest; more than 110 pitches (with no limit), 5 days of rest.

Connecticut is troubling for two reasons: the lack of a top limit, discussed above, and the fact that a pitcher can throw 110 pitches on Monday and pitch again on Friday (again, no regular major league starter would pitch again until Saturday).

PARENTS BEWARE!

While the overwhelming majority of HS coaches do a good job managing their pitchers to protect their arms, the theory here is that, given the explosion in Tommy John surgeries in the last 15 years or so, something had to be done.  Many of the coaches correctly point out that these state rules won’t stop a kid from pitching for his high school during the week and then pitching on the weekend for a travel team or at a showcase, where he will throw as hard as he can (to impress college or major league scouts).

While a good point, this is where the intelligent parent(s) has to step in and protect their son.  When your child is an excellent young pitcher, many people will try to take advantage of that.  While there are many well-qualified travel coaches, you probably should not let your child pitch on two teams at once; if you do, than it is up to you – the parent and not the coach —  to regulate your son’s pitch count.

Travel coaches are also in the business of winning.  The best approach, in this writer’s opinion, is to avoid pitching for multiple teams at the same time.  If you do, keep your own pitch count, not per team, but for your son as an individual.  If he has the talent to go to a showcase, talk with one or both coaches to set up a proper rest period both before and after a showcase.  Or, don’t go to a showcase at all (which admittedly would be tough under today’s system).

I would strongly suggest that you follow the pitching guidelines for pitches AND days of rest set forth at pitchsmart/pitching/guidelines.  These have recommendations for all ages.  If you can adhere to these recommendations (or, at least, get close to them if they don’t seem realistic to you), this will give your son a better chance (no guarantees) that he can avoid the epidemic of arm injuries that is spreading across the country now.

ONE ADDITIONAL ISSUE FOR ALL STATES

The obvious issue is: who’s going to count the pitches?  The new rules talk about having each side count the pitches and check with the other side after each half-inning.  If there is a discrepancy, the home team’s pitch count rules.

Uh-oh!  That could be a problem if the count goes up a pitch or two (or three) per inning against the visiting team’s star pitcher.  Could that happen?  Well, in the (again) overwhelming majority of situations, it won’t.  But, mistakes are made and, on (rare) occasions, someone may try to get the upper hand.

New Jersey has an additional rule that states that the home team has to provide an “independent adult” pitch counter, but, if they can’t, the home team’s count is the official count unless the umpire has “definite knowledge” that the count is wrong.  High school umps (and there are often only two per game) have more than enough on their plate to have “definite knowledge” of a pitcher’s pitch count.

Connecticut states that the pitch counter does not have to be an adult.  Well, again, mistakes can and will be made, especially if the pitch counter happens to a younger HS student who is just volunteering to help out.

Also, the punishment doesn’t fit the crime.  Apparently games can (and will?) be forfeited if pitch count mistakes are made.  That raises a number of issues: what if it was an honest mistake?  How do you prove it (absent a video of the game, which may now occur more)?  Is a game forfeit too big of a penalty?

The PSAL rule is that the coach is suspended for one game on the first violation.  After that, more serious punishment, including forfeiture of a game, is considered.

The latter rule seems more reasonable.

CONCLUSION

While well-meaning, the various rules from the various states can (and will) lead to issues.  While these new rules are an improvement on the past (believe it or not, the prior rule in New York State allowed a pitcher to pitch a maximum of 12 innings (yes, 12) per day and no more than 18 innings in a six-day period), they have to be carefully monitored and looked at during this season and changed when necessary (like the strange definition of days of rest in New York).

Obviously, the strange definition of days of rest in New York should be fixed immediately and the pitch count counters in all states have to be looked at carefully (and improved).

And remember, parents, it’s up to YOU, more than anyone (including right-minded coaches), to protect your son and his arm.

© COPYRIGHT 2017 BY STEVE KALLAS ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

PITCH COUNTS: 16-Year-Old Throws 772 Pitches in 9 Days

Leo Mazzone, the former long-time pitching coach of the Atlanta Braves and Baltimore Orioles, never kept pitch counts. He just observed the man on the mound very closely, and Leo could rely upon his own instincts and experience to know when the pitcher was tiring or if his mechanics were falling apart.

Nolan Ryan, the legendary fire-baller, liked to finish what he started, and the Hall of Famer never paid any attention to how many pitches he threw in a game. He routinely racked up large pitch counts in games, and it didn’t seem to bother Ryan as he pitched well into his 40s. Never really had any arm problems, either.

But of course, the prevailing mentality these days is to mark down every pitch a pitcher makes. Whether it’s Little League, HS, college, or pro ball, pitching coaches get nervous when the count gets to around 70 or 80 or more. Time to warm up the bullpen!

Now comes word of a 16-year-old Japanese prospect named Tomohiro Anraku who, during the course of the Koshien tournament (the largest HS sporting event in Japan – it’s held twice a year), racked up a total of 772 pitches in 9 days. Here’s the breakdown: Tuesday, he threw 232 pitches….Saturday, 159…Monday, 138….Tuesday, 134….Wednesday, 109.

Along the way, the 6-4 righty struck out 37 in 44 innings, walked only 7, and gave up 12 earned runs on 44 hits.

He is routinely clocked at 94 mph, but toward the end of his week-long efforts, his velocity dropped to the high 80s.

At the end, was he tired? Yes. Did his arm hurt, or become injured? Apparently not. Is going to take the rest of the year off? No, the August Koshien tournament starts up soon, and he’s eager to throw in that one as well.

Only time will tell whether this young man is getting good advice from his coaches, or whether he may be risking a serious injury that could potentially derail a possible pro career. We’ll see.